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Antonio & Girolamo Amati

(Cremona, b c1540; d c1610) & (Cremona, b 1562; d 1630)

Most of the instruments made between 1588 and Girolamo’s death from the plague in 1630 can therefore be assumed to be the work of Girolamo, although their labels refer to both of the brothers.

The Amati brothers strengthened the model their father had established and attained a remarkable level of perfection of craftsmanship that has, arguably, n

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Antonio & Girolamo Amati

Most of the instruments made between 1588 and Girolamo’s death from the plague in 1630 can therefore be assumed to be the work of Girolamo, although their labels refer to both of the brothers.

The Amati brothers strengthened the model their father had established and attained a remarkable level of perfection of craftsmanship that has, arguably, never been surpassed. From around 1620 the presence in the workshop of Girolamo’s son Nicolò is evident, as can be seen in a violin circa 1620 and a violin circa 1625. By the late 1620s Nicolò was responsible for the lion’s share of the work, so in this period we occasionally find instruments that are entirely the work of Nicolò, but which bear the original label of the brothers.

Instruments by Antonio & Girolamo Amati